Is Your Plantar Fasciitis Happening Due to a Hip or Pelvic Instability Issue?

Modern humans tend to live very lopsided lives when it comes to sports, daily habits, how we sit for work and how we hold babies, purses, backpacks etc.

Many people are walking around with a pelvic or hip instability issue without even knowing it. This is because the human body is amazing at compensating. It will compensate and compensate, sometimes for years without any pain at all…until one day it can’t take any more, and that’s when we get a pain signal.

The list of possible injuries or pain patterns that can happen due to a hip instability pattern are so numerous we’d be here all day if I went into them all, but the big surprise is plantar fasciitis.

If you’ve tried all the typical routes or methods of eliminating plantar fasciitis and your pain persists, it could be due to an underlying hip or pelvic instability issue. (Click here to learn about the most common causes of plantar fasciitis).

The short story on this complex issue:

Due to one or more imbalances in the fascia of the legs, your pelvis can experience a tilt, shift or rotation (or some combination thereof). This means it could be rotated forward on one or both sides, tilted to the left or right or otherwise shifted out of alignment.

When this happens, it is my belief that your brain detects potential danger to the central nervous system and spine (which requires a neutral pelvis to be at optimal health), and recruits one or more muscles of the low back or hip to contract neurologically to bring you back into balance.

Often, it’s the gluteus medius that is recruited this way and when it is – that muscle is no longer able to be recruited for its normal duties.

What does the gluteus medius do?

Gluteus medius and minimus abduct the thigh when the leg is straight and during gait (walking or running) these two muscles function to support the body on one leg to prevent the pelvis from dropping to the opposite side.

With the hip flexed, gluteus medius and minimus internally rotate the thigh. With the hip extended, they externally rotate the thigh, or more accurately they act to prevent internal rotation. Without this action the knee migrates inward, creating stress on the structures of the hip, knee and foot.

As you can tell, gluteus medius (and minimus) are critical for hip stability in ALL kinds of everyday actions. If one or both of these muscles is no longer able to do its job, it has to be done by other muscles.

How glute inhibition or hip instability leads to plantar fasciitis:

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Have Traditional Treatment Methods for Plantar Fascitiis Failed You? Here’s Why (opinion)

If you’ve had plantar fasciitis (or any pain) for a while, chances are you’ve tried one or more of the traditional treatment methods. Have you wondered why they’re not ‘working’? While this post is plantar fasciitis specific, the opinions expressed here would be the same for just about any pain in the body.

Don’t address symptoms, address the ROOT CAUSE!

While this isn’t a complete list, I wanted to address some of the most commonly used traditional methods for relieving plantar fasciitis and why they typically don’t work long term. Please keep in mind this is my opinion, and I am in no way suggesting you disregard the advice of a medical professional.

Rest:

While rest can be helpful, I do not believe it solves the problem at its root. Movement reveals and heals! So while I will always condone appropriate rest, I remain a fan of movement and staying mobile. Movement allows your body to tell you something is wrong (or not), and movement can often help heal.

Ice:

Using cold, either icing your foot or rolling it on a frozen water bottle, will provide temporary reprieve from the pain because ice dulls our pain receptors. The pain is still there, we just can’t feel it as strongly. As soon as the effects of the ice wear off the pain will likely come back. It’s also not addressing the root cause.

Brace or compression sleeve:

Wearing a brace or compression sleeve is a tempting plan for many looking for an ‘alternative’ approach. Most of the time we’ll wear a brace while working out, but some people like how it feels so much they wear it all day AND while sleeping. (Or, have you been told to wear the kind that places your foot in dorsiflexion all night?! I am very much against that…more on that in a minute).

Wearing a brace or compression sleeve may feel good temporarily, but the reasons it feels good are the same reasons this can kick the pain can down the road and/or make things worse (when you take it off). A brace, especially a tight one, partially immobilizes whatever joint you’re wearing it around; so you can’t move like you normally would. It may also cut off blood flow and block some nerve communication. It’s also forcing your fascia into a tight mold, and if you wear it long enough – that mold will become your new normal, the fascia stops being elastic and flexible, it loses its spring due to lack of proper blood flow and generally puts you into a scenario that will make eliminating your pain at the source even more difficult.

A night brace or sleeve that attempts to force you into dorsiflexion all night is a personally horrifying choice to me, because it’s like trying to hold a static stretch for 7-8 hours! I’m against static stretching to begin with, and trying to force your tissue (while cold and immobilized) to hold a stretch that long is just asking for something worse to happen. Muscle tissue has a tendency to resist static stretching, and more than likely it’s not your muscle tissue that’s the problem anyway…so even if you accomplish the job of lengthening those muscle fibers, chances are slim it will relieve or eliminate your pain; and it just might make things a lot worse, since the chances of irritating your attachments are now very high.

Pain pills:

I won’t be going into detail on the various kinds of painkillers. Bottom line is: pain pills work by blocking pain receptors in your brain. The pain is still there, we just don’t feel it anymore. So it may give us temporary relief, but pills will never address the root issue.

Cushiony shoes:

This option may sound like a good choice at first. Maybe you buy new shoes and suddenly your pain seems better! Until you take the shoes off.

If you baby your pain and try to silence it during the day while wearing specific shoes, while NOT addressing the root cause – then you’ve set yourself up to rely on soft shoes in order to feel less or no pain, but again, this isn’t addressing the root cause and the more you baby the pain the more likely it is to get worse in the long run.

Besides: don’t you want the option to go barefoot or wear flip flops or whatever shoes you want to wear?

Orthotics (shoe inserts):

Similar to the cushiony shoes, orthotics are not addressing the root cause and it’s another bandaid solution that makes you reliant on wearing it to feel less or no pain.

If your plantar fascia is really tight, or you have “flat feet” – those things are symptoms of mobility issues or a result of how you move through life or sports. They’re reversible too!

Not only will orthotics create another scenario of babying the pain (and when you take them out or try to go barefoot the pain usually comes raging back), but – it’s entirely possible you’ll experience new pain you never had before. Orthotics change your gait pattern, and any time you change your gait pattern you monkey with your joint and alignment. I’ve had lots of clients get orthotics for a foot issue, only to end up with knee or hip pain, or their spine going out of alignment.

Again – it’s not addressing the root cause of plantar fasciitis (or any pain).

Cortisone shots:

This is possibly a controversial stance to take, but it’s been my position for years: these shots are meant to be “merely” anti-inflammatory in nature, but there are a whole bunch of possible side effects that simply aren’t worth it (in my opinion). I am not telling you not to go for it if you want to, though I would hope you’d do so after investigating for yourself and knowing the risks (especially for shots in the feet!)

Click here to read the full list of potential side effects on the Mayo Clinic website.

Even IF these shots came with zero risk and simply took the inflammation down, it would still be my position that this isn’t addressing the root cause and by decreasing inflammation without addressing the root cause, we could make things worse in the long run.

Consider these possible side effects:

  • Joint infection
  • Nerve damage
  • Thinning of skin
  • Necrosis of nearby tissue
  • Necrosis of nearby bone
  • Tendon and ligament rupture
  • Inflammation
  • AND – the risk of experiencing any of these side effects goes up with every injection

The reason I am horrified by the thought of cortisone injections in the feet specifically is because we have so many small bones, tendons, ligaments, TONS of nerves, lots of fascia, many small joints etc. The chances of damaging any or all of these areas is significantly higher than say, getting a shot in your knee or shoulder – IN MY OPINION.

And remember – a shot does nothing to address the root cause, and may simply kick the pain can down the road, OR make things worse if you experience any of the potential side effects.

Surgery:

I won’t go into detail on this since I’m not a surgeon, but as I understand it – surgery for plantar fasciitis is a plantar fascia separation. I take this to mean they are attempting to create space through surgical separation of the plantar fascia – and you can absolutely do this naturally, on your own, with a lacrosse ball (click here for the how to). However – tight plantar fascia is typically a symptom of the underlying issue and NOT the root cause. So even doing this naturally will likely need to be accompanied by other techniques as well.

In conclusion:

What all of the above have in common are NOT addressing the root cause of pain and merely treating symptoms.

Have you been “stretching” as a way to relieve your plantar fasciitis? Here’s why it might be making things worse:

As most of you know by now, I’m not a fan of static stretching for most people (for any reason, but especially not if you’re in pain).

I see a lot of blogs and videos out there recommending you stretch your calves and feet to relieve plantar fasciitis. I NEVER recommend doing this.

Here’s why:

The plantar fascia or heel is already irritated from tight tissue upstream pulling on it. So yes, the tissue upstream does need to be released. It’s the fascia however that needs to be ‘stretched’ and/or released, NOT your muscle fibers. Not only will stretching your calves not address the actual problem, it might make things worse.

Static stretching tends to pull on muscle fibers forcing them to lengthen in a linear manner. Much of the time your muscle fibers will resist being stretched like this, and in the case of plantar fasciitis it can often make your pain worse because you’re now pulling on the tissue that’s already irritated from being pulled on!

Plantar fasciitis is a fascial issue, and to get lasting relief it needs to be addressed by looking at and releasing key areas of fascia. So, looking at the calves is very much going in the right direction. But go after the fascia, not muscle fiber if you want lasting relief.

 

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Why NAMING Plantar Fasciitis (or ANY Pain) Can Curb Healing – Do THIS Instead

This is part 2 of our 5 part series on understanding Plantar fasciitis. Click here for Part I and learn exactly what plantar fasciitis IS and what is causing it.

What’s in a name?

Have you ever noticed that we’re obsessed with naming things? We’ve given every pain in the body a title that includes something like itis, syndrome, disorder or disease on the end. We name viruses and flu strains, and there a lot of people who name their tumors when they get cancer.

In some ways, I get this: when we name something, it feels familiar and less scary. The unfamiliar or unknown feels scary.

However, I believe we’re doing ourselves a massive disservice with all this naming (at least when it comes to pain in the body).

Naming something does practically nothing to help us understand what’s happening or how to reverse it. What it does instead is allow us to take ownership of it. We say things like “I have sciatica.” “I have cancer.” “I have plantar fasciitis.”

“To have”: to hold, possess, accept; to get, receive or take.

Do you really want to hold, posses, accept, receive or take a named pain? Or do you want to find its root cause and eliminate it?

Instead of naming pain, let your body talk to you:

When you know how to interpret your body’s signals, not only will pain stop feeling scary but you’ll very likely quit wanting to name it. Instead, you’ll let your body talk to you. Every “negative” (painful) sensation is your body’s way of trying to communicate to and work with you, so you can both feel unstoppable and live a long healthy life. Your body isn’t trying to annoy or betray you, it’s asking for HELP.

When you look up ‘plantar fasciitis’ online it is almost always described as pain that shows up in the heel where the Achilles tendon meets the plantar fascia.

However, not everyone that experiences plantar fasciitis has pain there.

A LOT of you are experiencing pain in the ARCHES of your foot, maybe even under the ball or big toe.

Some of you may have BOTH at once – pain in the heel AND pain in arches.

Some of you have pain in BOTH feet; and some of you in only one.

Maybe you have pain in the arches on ONE foot and pain in the heel on the other…

Every one of these scenarios suggests a different root cause, possibly multiple and compounding causes!

This is one reason why I’m not fond of naming pain (be it plantar fasciitis, sciatica, ITBS etc), because when we do this, all the important factors – where the pain is, what it feels like, how it might jump around or move depending on activities etc – get lost and we focus on “having” and owning whatever name we’ve been assigned, instead of listening to our body and trying to interpret what it’s telling us.

Only by getting curious about what your body is telling you (feedback via sensation, immobility issues or pain through certain ranges of motion etc) will we start to unravel the puzzle and discover the root cause.

Pain doesn’t happen in a vacuum – it happens out there, in the ever-changing dynamics of life and how you are engaging your body in the world.

To reverse pain quickly and efficiently, we have to look at it out there as well, in the ever-changing dynamics of life and how you are engaging your body in the world. This is why, when I work with people one on one, I have them walk, lunge, jump, step up or down or go run outside in the parking lot – whatever movements get their body talking to them (and me).

Muscle attachments tell  us a LOT:

When you start to tune in to your body and listen, you’ll notice where the pain is, what it feels like, whether it radiates or is sharp and stabbing, and whether or not it moves around throughout the day.

The most obvious and easy to understand “clue” your body gives is WHERE the pain is.

As you can see from this picture, clues appear when we note that the Achilles tendon attaches near the site of pain.

If you have classic plantar fasciitis in the heel only, chances are high your Achilles tendon is tight – and if your Achilles tendon is knotted up or restricted, chances are so is your gastrocnemius and/or soleus fascia.

If you have outside heel pain, in your case maybe it’s the peroneus muscles that run along the outside or lateral part of the calf compartment and THROUGH the lateral heel and ANKLE that are restricted.

Some of you have pain on the INSIDE of your heel, and when we look at that anatomy we see the medial soleus and gastroc muscles, the toe flexor muscles and tibialis posterior.

All of these muscles are the ones CLOSEST to or directly upstream of the foot, and MIGHT be contributing to your plantar fasciitis but it’s important to remember that it could also be something further upstream, or perhaps these muscles being restricted are a symptom of something else (a bigger overall issue such as a hip instability patter – which we’ll talk about in Part 5 of this series).

This is ALL valuable information because WHERE your pain is points to exactly WHERE you need to go to get relief.

Don’t worry, you don’t need to become an anatomy nerd to get yourself out of pain!

That’s where I come in.

I’ve learned most of the plantar fasciitis patterns by now, and I want to take what I’ve learned to help you get – and stay – out of pain.

If you’re in pain right now and want relief in as little as one week, then I want to help you walk away from PF for good!

Break Up With Your PF™ - Say Goodbye to Plantar Fasciitis For Good!

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Plantar Fasciitis – What Causes It, Why It’s Happening and What to Do About It

Are you ready to Break Up With Your PF™?

Plantar Fasciitis, that is.

If you do – first, you have to understand what it is and what’s causing it.

This issue is one of the most debilitating and least understood “injuries” a human being can experience.

I put “injuries” in quotations because (and this is why this issue seems to confound western medical science), there’s often nothing structurally wrong (visible to imaging machines or other diagnostic methods) to point to as the cause of pain.

There are no broken bones, nearby joints probably looks ok, and usually there’s nothing ‘wrong’ with the soft tissue either (other than inflammation), from a western medical standpoint. There might be a heel spur, or minor tearing of the plantar fascia itself – but this is often looked at in a vacuum as the cause and site of pain when it’s actually a symptom of something else.

Without knowing the cause of something it’s almost impossible to know the solution.

Any attempts to eliminate pain without first knowing the cause is like throwing darts at an unknown target in the dark! The chances of hitting the correct target are next to nil.

If you’re ready to say goodbye to plantar fasciitis and hello to happy feet, click here. If you want to understand it more first, keep reading.

What IS plantar fasciitis?

Traditionally, plantar fasciitis is described as “heel pain,” but people are often diagnosed (or self diagnose) with plantar fasciitis whether they have pain in the heel UNDER the calcanues (heel bone) on the bottom of the foot, on the inside or outside of the heel NOT on the bottom of the foot (so, below the inside or outside ankle), whether the pain is in the arches and sometimes PF can be classified as pain under the ball of the foot.

While these details may not matter for a diagnosis (and I am NOT in the business of diagnosing anyone), they sure as heck matter to figure out the solution. We’ll be talking more about the various kinds of PF pain in Part 2 of this 5-part series.

In the simplest terms, plantar fasciitis is “inflammation of the plantar fascia.”

Hmmmm…this doesn’t tell us much, does it?

While it doesn’t tell us much…it’s a start. The problem with most ‘diagnostics’ is, they stop here. But not us. We’re going to take this to its end point – or, root cause. We’re going to ask why like an annoying little kid who will not settle for anything less than the truth, until we get to the bottom of this! (Pun intended?! :P)

So, your foot hurts. And there’s inflammation present…

Why is the plantar fascia inflamed?

Ahhhh…by asking this question, now we can get somewhere!

The plantar fascia is inflamed because something (or several somethings) are irritating it. In order to understand plantar fasciitis, we have to understand at least a little about fascia. After all, it’s even in the name of this debilitating issue!

If you want a more comprehensive crash course on fascia, click here.

What is fascia?

fasciaecmFascia, or connective tissue, coats every nerve ending and then wraps the whole nerve. It wraps every fibril of muscle tissue, every fiber of muscle, every muscle bundle and then every muscle group is wrapped in large tough sheets of the stuff, which come together and turn into tendons and ligaments, also fascia – just a denser version – which connects to our bones. Every bone is coated in a layer of fascia, as are all of our organs.

We have MORE of this fascia stuff than anything else in the body! And this fascial system is meant to be elastic, flexible and able to move with us.

All fascia has within it something called ground substance and the extracellular matrix (ECM), and it is this ground substance that gives fascia its spring because it contains a gel-like substance that keeps the fascia hydrated and our cells nourished.

The ECM is responsible for distributing force and tension throughout the fascial system so we don’t damage ourselves from one hit (it’s our SHOCK ABSORBER!)

BUT – and we’re about to get into what the heck this has to do with plantar fasciitis here in a second – with overuse, under use, age and other factors like trauma and injuries, the fascial system starts to get dehydrated and then brittle. It LOSES ITS SPRING. It also sticks to itself in knots or adhesions, pulling muscle fibers with it and pulling on or irritating attchements.

It is this combo of dehydrated and knotted up restricted fascia that creates pain and inflammation in the plantar fascia.

Why does the fascia become unhealthy?

The posterior fascial chain. Photo rights belong to Anatomy Trains.

The posterior fascial chain. Photo rights belong to Anatomy Trains.

This is the topic of a future episode. For now, we’re sticking to the anatomical or physiological causes of PF pain.

Most of the time, plantar fasciitis pain is stemming from tightness and restriction in your calves and hamstrings. Sometimes it can come from fascial restrictions higher up the posterior chain or in the upper body like your traps, but those cases are rare in my experience and often indiciate a deeper underlying issue.

The most common pattern that falls into this category is a hip or pelvic instability problem. Going after the glute in this case though wouldn’t be the correct solution, because the glute isn’t the problem either, it’s another symptom of dysfunction! (Part 5 of this series is all about this hip instability issue, and I’ll break it down for you so no need to understand it right now!)

Bottom line is…your plantar fascia starts to get irritated and angry. WHY?

Something (or several things) UPSTREAM are starting PULL on the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia.

At the same time, if your entire lower leg compartment has fascia that is dehydrated and brittle, you’ve lost the ability to absorb and distribute force and tension or in other words you’ve lost your SHOCK ABSORPTION! And…

With EVERY step you take walking around, and especially running, there’s nowhere to distribute the impact – so it’s felt –

GUESS WHERE?

YOUR HEEL!

And now we have a scenario where all those tiny bones, tendons, ligaments and joints in your foot are bearing the weight and impact of your body and activities, when that job is SUPPOSED to be distributed throughout your entire lower body.
This is one reason why it can start to feel like you’re walking around on a bruise. In many ways this may be quite accurate, because the calcaneus bone and all the small tendons, ligaments and joints within your foot start to feel the brunt of impact from every step and over time may very well start to bruise.

Your body may give you a pain signal here, or it might not happen until the fascia in your foot ALSO loses its spring and if the plantar fascia becomes dehydrated, brittle AND overstretched it is now in danger of tearing. This is one reason people get heel spurs – the body is trying to throw something down to make up for the loss in plantar fascia spring/length/durability.

OR, you may get the pain signal simply due to fascial restrictions in the calves and hamstrings pulling on the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia.

At some point the body, which is extremely intelligent and doesn’t do ANYTHING without reason, isolates that area for healing via INFLAMMATION.

Guess what inflammation does? It puffs up an area and mimics that squishy gel like make up of ground substance!

The body is likely trying to rehydrate that area with fresh plasma and prevent you from using it because that could cause further damage.

Little do you know, because no one ever told you this, but YOU CAN REHYDRATE YOUR FASCIA and give your foot exactly what it needs to stop getting your attention with a horrible and debilitating pain signal.

Most of the time plantar fasciitis is dead simple.

Like – there’s a tack in your forehead? Let’s pull it out! BAM! Done. That simple.

Notice I didn’t say easy, I said simple – the process of getting out of pain involves effort, curiosity and patience, but if it took you years to get here and it only takes a week or two to get out of pain, I’d say that’s pretty great success!

Sometimes however, it can be more complicated. In Part II we’ll be going over the different variations of plantar fasciitis, and why this matters for getting out of pain.

If you’re suffering with plantar fasciitis and want to get out of pain for good, check out our brand new course by clicking the picture link below.

Break Up With Your PF™ - Say Goodbye to Plantar Fasciitis For Good!

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The Truth About Fascia – It Doesn’t Just ‘Wrap’ Muscles & It Might Just be the Fountain of Youth!

So you’ve heard a bit about fascia by now..but do you really know what it is and how it functions in your body?

Fascia (otherwise known as connective tissue) has become quite the buzzword. Which is awesome!

When I started working with fascia in 2008 very few of my new clients knew what it was. Now fascia is a huge topic getting a lot of attention and all of my clients have at least heard of it. Many of the articles I read are spot on. And, a lot of them are – in my opinion – missing what I consider to be the most important details about this critical tissue.

If you’ve been wondering what all the fuss is about, this post is for you!

What is fascia?

In its simplest definition, fascia is a collagen-like substance that separates and connects almost everything in the human body.

Most people are familiar with the kind of fascia found in a steak or chicken breast, because this is similar to the fascia that wraps our muscles – and this is still what most people think of when they hear the word fascia.

But what most people do NOT know is just how much fascia we have, how critical it is for our entire well being and that it’s found in the tiniest of places down to the cellular level.

We have more fascia than anything else, certainly more than muscles and bones!

Fascia wraps every single nerve ending and nerve, every fibril of muscle tissue as well as the fiber (which is made up of multiple fibrils); it wraps every muscle bundle and muscle group and then turns into tendon and ligament (also fascia), which connects to our bones, also wrapped in fascia. It wraps our organs too.

When we observe fascia at the microscopic level and THEN zoom out, things get really interesting. This is about to get sciency, so hang with me.

Why is fascia so critical?

nervefascia

I think we can all agree that nerves – and the nervous system – are critical for us to function optimally every moment we’re alive, right?

Well…

Every nerve in the body is a cordlike structure containing bundles of axons. Within a nerve each axon is surrounded by a layer of connective tissue (fascia) called the endoneurium. The axons are bundled together into groups called fascicles, and each fascicle is wrapped in a layer of connective tissue called the perineurium. Then, the entire nerve is wrapped in a layer of connective tissue called the epineurium.

Fascia wraps each part of a nerve and every nerve in its entirety, and we have a hundred billion of them!

The implications of this fact alone are enormous, and largely unstudied or talked about.

The nervous system is the master regulator of everything that happens to and within us in our lifetimes. Every thought we think produces a feeling, and every single feeling is FELT in the body as sensation, via the nervous system.

I’m convinced the fascia feels everything that our nerves do – perhaps on an even more intense or widespread level.

Take fear for example: whenever we feel fear we tend to experience it as anxiety or adrenaline, tension or stress. When we feel joy it’s often described as light, expansive, buoyant. Our feelings and actions every day direct the hormone cocktail released by the brain to regulate whatever state(s) we’re in.

Literally everything that happens to us in life – good and bad – is felt and recorded within the fascial structure or system.

I also have it on good authority (from an orthopedic surgeon) that fascia bleeds a LOT more than muscle when cut into. Fascia contains more of our blood supply than anything else. This fact alone also gives fascia an incredibly important role – by being the main source of fresh blood within the body.

Healthy fascia gives us “spring” (aka, it’s our shock absorption!)

All connective tissue has within it something called ground substance, one of the most important elements in the human body.

Ground substance is an amorphous gel like substance that surrounds every cell; it contains the nutrients that FEED every cell in our body, AND it takes the waste excreted by every cell and ushers it out of our body.

So basically – fascia is our nutrient AND waste distributor!

That’s not all though…

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Improve Your Posture to Relieve or Prevent Text Neck, Shoulder and Mid Back Pain

Our posture pretty much sucks these days.

This isn’t about propriety or your grandma yelling “stop slouching!”

This is about your quality of life, because in our modern era poor posture doesn’t just mean a bit of shoulder tension or slightly forward rotated shoulders – it means PAIN, and lots of it.

While smart phones were a genius invention, our insatiable appetite for constant engagement means we’re hunched over our phones all day every day. (I mean, I even see people crossing the street or riding their bike while cranking their heads down to stare at their phones!)

All this hunching over and bending our necks puts the equivalent of a 60 POUND WEIGHT on our cervical spine!

Over time this creates a nightmarish domino effect of pain, because an unhealthy cervical spine can lead to serious neck pain, shoulder issues; mid back pain; low back pain, elbow tendonitis or wrist issues, not to mention grip issues from lack of nerve ennervation to the hands due to fascial blocks created in the scalene area of our neck.

The THREE “R’s” of better posture:

  1. Release the overworked, over-tight areas.
  2. Restore muscle memory and neural pathways of good posture.
  3. Reinforce the muscle memory and neural pathway of good posture by strengthening the weak/overstretched muscles in your mid/upper back.

RELEASE:

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Athletes – Increase Your Efficiency & Power Potential as a Mover by Up to 10x

What if I told you that you have as your birthright the ability as a mover and athlete to feel weightless, springy, even buoyant? What if I also told you that the same way you access this birthright allows you to need less or no warm-up time before activities, helps you recover faster and rarely get sore? And, what if I told you that this same system, when optimized, could dramatically increase your efficiency and power potential as an athlete (meaning, if you’re a competitive athlete you may just decrease times and increase speed/agility/ability)?

All of the above is absolutely available to you.

Healthy fascia grants us this birthright.

If you want to access all of the above, listen up:

We have 10 times as many proprioceptors in our fascia than we do muscle fiber.

Proprioception is the brain’s ability to detect our physical body in space, and then conduct our movements within that space.

If you’re an athlete it’s critical to know your way around whatever space you perform in right? If you’re a gymnast that means you need to know your way around the balance beam, uneven bars or how to throw yourself across the floor. If you’re a trail runner you need to have keen awareness of your terrain, ideally without that awareness interrupting your ability to run quickly. If you’re an MMA fighter you need to not only be able to control your body in physical space, but be able to predict and control someone else’s too!

All of these things require healthy proprioception.

Have you ever tried to perform a movement only to feel like you have a “dumb” arm or leg? Maybe it’s easier on one side than the other. This has a lot do with proprioception!

Let’s get nerdy for a moment:

Proprioceptors are highly specialized sensory receptors on nerve endings found in muscles, tendons and joints. They’re responsible for communicating information about motion and position between our brain and body to make us aware of our own body position and movement in space. Proprioceptors detect subtle changes in movement, position, tension and force within the body.

I’ll say it again because it’s so crazy important:

We have 10 times as many proprioceptors in our fascia than we do muscle fiber!

I’m not going to get super sciency on you, because this whole process is quite complicated when we start talking nerves, brain, muscle spindles, golgi tendons etc. The important thing is, because of the distribution of proprioceptors in our fascial system, then…

On a very physical/visceral level, our fascial system is an organ of perception!

Fascia is the main system by which we perceive ourselves – body and psyche – in the physical world.

If you have fascia that is dehydrated, brittle and/or stuck to itself in giant adhesions that aren’t allowing muscle fibers to glide quickly and efficiently or nerves to communicate effectively, then your proprioception is going to SUCK.

Think of the fascia like a superhighway for our nerves to travel between the body and brain. If that superhighway crumbles in places or gets squished to only one lane, then those nerves are going to have a much harder time traveling and communicating freely. And our sensory receptors – proprioceptors – won’t be able to communicate efficiently.

Most of us walk around every day not realizing how GOOD we can feel! We enter adulthood and get used to feeling a little creaky, achy, heavy…and since no one told us we could feel any different, that becomes our normal; slowly getting worse and worse as we age.

Well I’m here to tell you that’s NOT how we have to feel!

I do NOT believe we have to age like this. I believe, based on experience, that we can feel light, springy, bouyant and powerful as movers for as long as we want – if we take care of our fascia.

I was certainly one of those people that always felt heavy and achy, like I was carrying around a bunch of led weights…until I stumbled onto this amazing birthright we’ve been granted as human beings.

I accidentally optimized my body for peak performance as an athlete:

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Fascia, Fat Shaming and Cellulite – Are You Saying Yes to Self Abuse, or Self Love?

Would you feel concerned if your teenage daughter, or any young woman you know, started showing up with bruises covering her body?

What if she told you she was doing this to herself to get rid of her cellulite by breaking up her fascia?

I would sit that girl down immediately and have a heart to heart about body acceptance and self love! I’d share my own struggles and triumphs with self loathing and love, and I’d share my wisdom as a fascia expert.

It may not be my 13 year old niece showing up like this (yet), but my instincts are the same.

There is a hot new product on the market right now, and…

I have to speak out.

It’s gaining rapid popularity because it’s supposed to eliminate cellulite, which the maker claims doesn’t even exist and is nothing more than tight or adhesed fascia.

A lot of you have written me privately to ask my opinion, so I knew I had to look into it. I spent a lot of time doing so and I’ve been feeling angry, sad and concerned.

I feel protective of the human body, the female psyche, and fascia – and I want to take a stand for self love.

What I saw and read researching this product was concerning to me for reasons both professional (as a fascia and pain relief expert) and personal (as a woman who once had severe body image issues).

This is NOT a product review. I haven’t used it and have no intention of doing so. I’m not in any way suggesting you shouldn’t purchase something if it speaks to you. I always advocate doing your own research, thinking for yourself and doing what feels right for YOU and your body.

I am a fascia expert and I want to speak out!

I’ve been working with people in pain using compression and active based fascial release since 2008 (click here if you want to know what I do in my private practice).

I’ve worked on people ages 5 to 80; curvy people, thin people, active, inactive, happy, depressed, self-loving and self-loathing, male, female; my clients range from amateur to professional athletes, everyday desk jockies to orthopedic surgeons…and through all this work, and my own journey with healing from debilitating knee pain, I have developed a profound respect and appreciation for the human body, and fascia in particular.

As a fascia expert I feel it’s my duty to speak up and offer an alternative opinion about fascia and cellulite.

And as a woman I feel it’s my duty to speak up about body acceptance and self love.

I’m not naming this product on purpose. If you’ve seen the ads then you’ll know what I’m talking about.

Do you love or loathe your body?

By the time I turned 13 I hated my body.

I was 5’3″, I had big muscles, I had belly fat and a big butt and I knew I would never look like I was “supposed” to look – tall, skinny, toned and devoid of fat (what all the magazines and media kept telling me I should look like).

I spent years being internally abusive to myself because I was ashamed of my body and spent a lot of energy every day wishing I looked different than I did.

Can you relate?

This photo of me was taken at the beginning of my worst years of body shame (I weigh the same now as I did then). I may have had a smile on my face but there was so much self loathing going on inside, all day every day. When I think about it now I feel so sad.

I want something better for young women!

How might the world be different if we ushered girls (and boys!) through those already challenging enough teenage years by helping them – as a CULTURE – learn to LOVE their bodies, appreciate them and find a million and ten ways to have FUN and ENJOY life…instead of becoming obsessed with diets and weight loss programs and comparing ourselves to photo-shopped celebrities and models?

It took me until my 30’s to learn to LOVE my body, exactly as it is.

Right now I can tell you I adore my body. I’m so grateful for it. I love how strong I am. I love my curves. I love my butt (and so does my man!) I love my soft belly and my dimpled thighs. I feel at home in this body now. I have a reverent appreciation for every aspect of this human form I get to call home – especially my fascia, knowing the part it plays in my overall health and ability to climb mountains and run pain free while feeling light and springy.

And I gotta tell you – I have ZERO interest in this product, even though it’s meant for fascia and I’m ALL about fascia – because I LOVE my body. I have no desire to change my cellulite and bruise myself in the process of trying.

Women – our bodies are MIRACULOUS!

I haven’t had children yet; but I’m alive because of a woman’s body. My mother’s body.

Evolution gave us women a precious gift, a biological blessing because we bring children into this world: we are given extra stores of FAT so just in case of famine we have fuel stores to be able to feed babies without anyone starving!

Shouldn’t we feel grateful for this evolutionary adaptation?! It’s really quite amazing when you think about it. In years and cultures past it was the curvy women who were revered. Today, we despise this biological intelligence and shame ourselves for it. And I think that is a shame.

As adult women we teach young girls how to treat their bodies by how we treat ours – and right now, almost everywhere I look we’re still teaching young girls to hate their curves and their fat. (Though I do think it’s changing and there ARE people out there creating movements for the change I want to see, like Amy Schumer, Girls Gone Strong and my amazing friend Jade Beall.

Can we please start worshiping HEALTHY and SELF LOVING, no matter what kind of packaging those come in?

I believe we can be healthy whether we’re thin/curvy/tall/short/have cellulite/don’t have it…

I want to see us adult women teaching young girls how to LOVE their bodies.

We do this by loving OUR bodies – EXACTLY AS THEY ARE.

We do this by choosing to do things FOR ourselves and our bodies out of self love rather than TO ourselves out of self loathing.

Is cellulite nothing more than tight fascia?

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The One Rule of Effective Fascial Release, And Why Massage Doesn’t ‘Release’ Fascia

Have you ever wondered why massage therapy doesn’t “release” fascia? I mean…those deep tissue massages hurt! They must be doing something, right?

I want to let you in on a little secret that will help you understand fascia and how to create changes within that soft tissue system that last.

First…let’s dive into a mini crash course on fascia, just in case you’re still unsure exactly what this stuff is.

What is fascia?

Fascia is a collagen-like substance that permeates the entire human body. Every nerve ending is coated in a piece of fascia, as is every muscle fibril and fiber, every muscle bundle and group, and all of this turns into tendon and ligament, which attach to our joints. Even our bones and organs are wrapped in fascia! We have more of this substance in our body than anything else.

While the picture to the right is a great example of how it wraps the muscle fibers, what that image doesn’t show is all the billions of nerves it wraps that travel within the soft tissue system, which means this stuff isn’t linear – it’s a vast and criss-crossing matrix.

Fascia is supposed to be elastic, flexible, STRONG and resilient. Since it wraps literally everything in the body that supports LIFE, I have come to believe it is meant to be almost bulletproof; like the Kevlar that protects our nerves, muscle fibers, bones and organs. (It’s much, much more than this, but this’ll do for today’s crash course).

If fascia were easily change-able we’d be in BIG trouble! Every time we bump into anything we’d damage ourselves. Heck, even sitting down would cause a re-molding of the fascia in our hips and butts if fascia were that quick to change.

Thus, it is my conclusion that fascia will not change easily due to ANY outside force attempting to change it (if it did, it would betray one of its primary roles in our evolution!)

This includes most methods of massage therapy as well as all those fancy new gadgets and gizmos one the market right now that claim to melt or release your fascia if you smash and blast it hard enough.

To truly change the fascial system, we have to ask the fascia to change itself.

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Release Tibialis Anterior and Peroneals Fascia to Relieve Pain on TOPS of Feet, Shin Splints, Foot Cramps and More

If you have tendonitis or pain on the TOPS of your feet, cramping on the BOTTOMS of your feet, shin splints or a strained/pulled soleus muscle then you are going to LOVE this. (And those are just a FEW of the things this technique can help with).

TOOLS NEEDED: Lacrosse ball and 25+lb weight plate (most gyms have both of these).

Please take the necessary steps to do this with the same equipment I’m using in the video, because I want you to get the BEST result, and you will NOT get the same result using a tennis ball, golf ball, soft ball or any ball without a weight plate.

Let’s look at some anatomy shall we? (Hello my fellow body/anatomy nerds!)

The fascia here affects SO MANY things:

Remember, it’s the FASCIA we’re after in terms of releasing tissue, not any particular muscle(s).

The muscles are important though because they indicate which direction(s) the tissues move in terms of shortening and lengthening and acting on various joints – and it’s where and how the tissues are being asked to move combined with the fascial restrictions within the muscle groups that is what creates the pain patterns I’m about to talk about.

Tibialis anterior:

Otherwise known as the “shin muscle,” tibialis anterior (or TA for short) attaches laterally at the top of the tibia, near the knee, and (via its distal tendon) attaches to the medial cuneiform (a bone on the inside of the foot) and first two metatarsals (which lead to the big toe bones).

Got BIG TOE issues? This is definitely something to check!

TA dorsiflexes the ankle and inverts the foot.

Peroneals:

All three peroneal muscles attach to the fibula and metatarsals of the foot.

Here is where things get interesting: all three of these muscles evert the foot, but two peroneal muscles – fibularis or peroneus longus and fibularis or peroneus brevis – plantarflex the foot while fibularis or peroneus tertius dorsiflexes it!

So between tibialis anterior and the peroneals all acting on the foot in opposing ways, it’s no surprise that if the fascia gets clogged, tight, dehydrated or stuck…ANY of these actions of the foot could become confused leading to dysfunction (or pain) anywhere downstream of the knee – the ankle and retinaculum, the tops of the feet and toes, the plantar fascia, pain with eversion or inversion…and possibly pain upstream as well, due to gait changes or how the ankle affects the knee which affects the hip, etc.

Let’s explore the most common issues this release technique will help relieve:

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