Restless Leg Syndrome – Possible Causes and How to Find Relief

Restless leg syndrome affects 3 million people every year in America alone. This condition is still really mysterious to the medical community, with “no known cure.”

Typical experiences of people who have restless leg syndrome are an uncontrollable urge to move the legs, a “twitchy” feeling like something is crawling on or inside your legs and it seems to affect people age 40 and older a lot more than those of younger age.

Stefan surprised me with this topic…the first episode in a new series we’re trying out for Mobility Mastery Monday: Pop Q&A! I have no idea what he’ll ask me before we start filming these episodes, and we just take it from there.

What if restless leg syndrome could go away fast?

Why does it seem so mysterious to modern science and the medical community?

What the heck is restless leg syndrome anyway?

I am NOT a doctor, and this isn’t intended as medical advice, nor is it meant to diagnose or cure anyone. I offer some of my experience and opinions.

What if your legs are simply twitchy and restless?

What if there’s a reason for this?

What if you could get relief today?

Watch the video below to learn more, and then please share and comment!

If you have restless leg syndrome and want to find out if fascial release can help, my top recommendations are releasing your hamstring and calf fascia.

Here’s my hamstring self-help technique using a lacrosse ball and weight plate:

Below is the overall BEST lower leg compartment and calf release technique:

If you can’t get into the position of the above technique, try this calf release instead:

Please share this post if you know anyone struggling with restless leg syndrome, and if you have comments or questions drop them below!

If you enjoyed this new version of Q&A Monday and have a question that you’d like us to feature and me to answer, please send your questions to stefancox@mobilitymastery.com so he can surprise me with them.

See ya next time 🙂

If you liked this post please “like” and share it!

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Relieve Heel Pain and Recover from Rolled Ankles – Inner Calf Release

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This area of the body warrants a close look at the anatomy, while the technique itself is very simple.

This one small area, when fascially restricted, can wreak havoc on the entire foot, ankle, heel, plantar fascia and quite possibly a lot of things upstream as well, such as knees, the groin, the SI area and possibly even your neck and head (headaches CAN sometimes be related to this line of fascia being too tight/restricted).

We’re not going to look at the entire body or ALL the ways this one area can impact the body.

Today I want to focus on 3 main things: plantar fasciitis and/or heel pain that is showing up directly in line with the flexor digitorum longus and tibialis posterior tendons, and how this area plays a part in rolling ankles.

You’ll need a lacrosse ball for this one. I do NOT recommend using any other ball, nor do I recommend a theracane (I’ve seen some people use this). The first is too big, and the second too pointed and you’ll likely bruise (something I’m always trying to avoid).

This one small area packs a punch, fascially speaking:

There’s a lot going on in this one small area: the medial head of the gastrocnemius along with the soleus (meidal) and their fascia can get stuck to each other and to the flexor digitorum longus fascia. The flexor digitorum longus, when over-tight (or stuck to other muscles via their connecting fascia), can over-invert the foot, making the ankle susceptible to being rolled.

Also potentially leading to over-inversion of the foot is tibialis posterior, and via its tendon can contribute to ankle pain or heel pain between the ankle and calcaneus.

While we won’t necessarily be getting it directly, this technique can help free up the tibialis posterior, particularly the posterior tibialis TENDON which has a big impact on heel and ankle health.

If you have flat feet, fallen arches or your foot drops (arch collapses) while walking, this is one area to look at (it may not be the culprit) along with everything in the lateral line – ankle and foot fascia, tibialis anterior, perroneals, IT Band fascia etc.

The relationship these two (the medial and lateral lines of fascia) have with one another can determine SO much of what happens in our bodies, because everything in the foot and ankle determines our stride and what happens upstream. If your ankle doesn’t articulate well or creates an unhealthy gait pattern, that pattern transfers up to the knees, hips and shoulders.

As usual around here, I’m less concerned with naming all the muscles involved than talking about the restricted fascia between and around all these muscles.

Fascia also wraps our bones, and I believe this is one area of the body where the fascia of these muscles is particularly clogged or stuck to the bone (in this case the tibia).

The technique I demonstrate in the video isn’t nearly as effective as the in person version that I use on clients, but it’s an acceptable self-help solution (or I wouldn’t be giving it to you).

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Learn the ONE Stretch That Relieves Plantar Fasciitis, Shin Splints, Achilles Pain, Heel Pain and Compartment Syndrome

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If you have tight calves (and if you’re active you probably have tight calves) then your body will thank you for doing this stretch.

First let me say that while this is a SUPER powerful stretch, it’s not a FULL solution for any of the following. With that said, it’s the best possible one-off solution I can give you right now, and if you do this daily for a week I would be shocked if you don’t feel significantly better for any or all of these:

This ONE technique can address ALL kinds of issues:

  • Plantar fasciitis, or pain on the bottoms of the feet
  • Shin splints
  • Compartment Syndrome
  • Heel Pain
  • Achilles tendinitis, pain or tightness
  • Scar tissue build-up from past sprained or broken ankles (which can lead to ankle immobility and compensation patterns up your entire chain)
  • Limited range of motion in the ankles
  • Knee Pain
  • Tendonitis on the tops of the feet (usually originating in the shins, so if this is you then focus on pinning your tibialis anterior or shin muscle more than calf)
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