Do you get headaches frequently?

Are you on the computer a lot?

Even if you don’t have a desk job, chances are you’re on your phone a significant portion of every day.

Well, maybe everyone else is…not YOU right? 😛

Are you experiencing eye strain?

According to a 2015 report from The Vision Council, about 61 percent of Americans have experienced eye strain after prolonged use of electronic devices — that’s nearly 2 out of every 3 people!

And…even if you’re not on your phone a lot, there are some other surprising ways you can strain your eyes that have nothing to do with a digital screen. In fact, that’s how I stumbled across this one weird technique that can instantly get rid of a headache (if the cause is eye strain, or tight fascia in and around your eyeball).

In the video you’ll hear my story of a 4 hour harrowing winter mountain drive that had me fixated on the road, how this led to a raging headache and then…

I’m going to show you how to release your eyeball fascia in today’s episode! So get ready for some seriously awkward moments. Feel free to laugh at me, and then I hope you laugh at yourself as you try this!

Even if you don’t get headaches, your eyes are probably getting strained on a regular basis. I mean…no matter your age, career, hobbies or where you live in the world, chances are you’re peering intently at that tiny cell phone screen at least 2 hours a day. Your eyeball and surrounding fascia may be overworked and restricted, even without the presence of headaches.

You may just experience a feeling of spaciousness in your noggin and eyes that you haven’t had in a while.

What we’re targeting:

We’re targeting the fascia of the tiny muscles in the eyelids, eyebrows, eyeball and specifically the fascia behind your eyeball (the fascia bulbi, pictured to the left).

This technique might seem really weird, but if you think about it…we have a LOT of tiny muscles all around the eyeball! And every muscle in the body contains layers of fascia. Not to mention, every nerve ending in the body is coated in a piece of fascia and the optic nerve is no different!

The lateral and medial rectus muscles lay on the eyeball laterally and medially, and the suspensory ligament (fascia) holds the eye’s lens in place!

ALL this fascia, like any fascia in the body, can get tight and restricted. What happens to restricted fascia? It can most certainly cause pain. It also restricts blood flow! Our eyes need blood as much as any other part of the body, and if the fascia in and around our eyes is really tight…it won’t flow in as freely.

How to release your eyeball fascia:

Read More