Free the Balls: Can tight fascia cause testicle pain?

Guest Post: Stefan Cox

Doc, I’m not exactly sure how to say this, but… my testicles are in a world of hurt. Sound familiar? Let’s hope not, especially for our ladies in the audience, but for men it’s not as uncommon as you might think. Nobody wants to talk about it, just like nobody wants to walk in to a doctor’s office for a physical and cough while someone you see once a year checks your unmentionables to make sure there’s no hernia. So let’s break a little taboo here.

Don’t be bashful:

Most men (myself included) experience testicle pain at some point, and it’s always good to make sure and rule out any potential issues that could be really serious. However, there are a lot of men who experience testicle pain that is simply a result of fascial adhesions in other areas of their bodies. Elisha has encountered this in her private practice before, but it’s highly unusual because most men are a little too bashful to come out and say it… but if you’ve been in pain long enough, that dignity starts to fade pretty fast. I don’t think we should be ashamed of this issue, and it’s usually a completely natural issue. Often testicle pain will manifest as a result of fascial adhesions or tension in the adductors. When Elisha did encounter this in her private practice, releasing the adductor had a massive impact on relieving testicle pain.

Other potential causes of testicle pain could be pain that originated in the sitz bones, and because that pain wasn’t properly addressed, it later resulted in testicle pain. No matter what the cause is, it’s not anything to be bashful about, and is a serious issue for plenty of men. I rarely have testicle pain, but getting my adductors released (although it can be intense) always helps me feel more mobile through the hips, testicles, and perineum and relieves tension and tightness in those areas. I highly recommend it for anyone struggling with testicle pain, or if you’re simply looking to gain mobility and relieve a little tension.

Taking care of the family jewels: 

So fellas, let’s make sure we’re taking care of our boys and giving them the attention and care they deserve, not just constant bragging and references to being well endowed. And ladies, thank your for bearing with us through this unusual post, and don’t forget that the adductors are often tied to female genitalia pain too. For anyone looking to eliminate genitalia pain or tension, check out is the adductor self-help release technique.

I’d love to hear more from you about your stories and experiences with the genitalia pain in relation to the adductors or other parts of the body. If you’ve been experiencing pain, were you able to eliminate it with the adductor release technique? If you have other pain that’s led to to testicle pain, what do you think the root cause was? How can we make this issue a little less taboo and get both men and women the help they need?

Please share this post if you want to contribute to the conversation, and don’t forget to #freetheballs. If you have comments or questions drop them below! And if you enjoyed this Q&A Monday and have a question that you’d like us to feature, please send your questions to stefancox@mobilitymastery.com so I can surprise Elisha with them :).

See ya next time,

Stefan

Fascia and the Nervous System

Guest Post: Stefan Cox

The nervous system:

Holy shit, where do we even begin? It’s connected to everything. Every pain sensation, pleasure sensation and everything in between. It’s connected to breathing, movement, drugs, diet, thought, and pretty much every human activity you could think of. As Elisha’s said many times, every nerve ending is coated in a piece of fascia. There’s plenty of scientific evidence supporting the existence of a relationship between fascia and the nervous system, yet there is a very limited understanding of that relationship. Elisha is one of few people I know of who is consciously aware of this relationship between fascia and the nervous system, and is the only person I know of who is facilitating communication between the nervous system and fascia in a way that can result in lasting physiological and psychological change.

Being new to this information, I’m naturally very curious about it’s implications for me personally, and for a wide variety people with a wide variety of challenges. A few years ago I never would have dreamed that you could impact autoimmune diseases through fascial release. Now I find myself asking questions like: Are there different categories/types of nervous systems that manifest physically in the fascia? Do you think the fascial system is an organ? If it’s an organ, then what’s it’s primary function?

Metaphors: Fascia and the nervous system

All of these questions (and many more) bewilder me when I start thinking about the implications of how they could help us physically, mentally, and everywhere in-between. I love the metaphor Elisha talks about in this video: if our lives are a story, the fascia is the paper and the nervous system is the pen. Sometimes we are so caught up writing the same damn story that it’s easier to change that story by introducing a new kind of paper (or medium) than it is to try and change how we write. To carry on the metaphor, most of us have been writing the same story in the same way for years… because it served us at some point. Sure, there are ways to change how we write by addressing it directly, and they’re usually a slow arduous process. But if we are given a new kind of paper/medium to write our stories on, our style of writing changes naturally and out of necessity to accommodate the novelty it’s been presented with.

I think traditional healing modalities and activities, like psychotherapy, meditation, massage, nlp, yoga, etc. are all beneficial activities. If you enjoy them or feel benefit from them, they can be good tools. I have used all of the above to varying extents and felt benefit from them… and if you’re looking for the most efficient tools to change your story, then I think it’s best to look at tools that change the medium you write your story on. Kinetix is one of those tools, and is the most novel tool I know of.

Questions and more questions:

As I’ve continued to grow and learn I’ve become more and more curious about novel and effective ways of changing the mind and body to bring us more fulfillment in life. I think the nervous system is a fascinating piece of that puzzle, and I can’t wait to nerd out about it more!

I’d love to hear more from you about your stories and experiences with the nervous system, fascia, or both. What are your thoughts and opinions on changing the medium for effective change? How can we leverage this knowledge of the nervous system to better our lives? What are your favorite practices and techniques for bringing about real, effective, and efficient change in your life?

Please share this post if you want to contribute to the conversation or if you know anyone struggling with nervous system issues. If you have comments or questions drop them below! And if you enjoyed this Q&A Monday and have a question that you’d like us to feature, please send your questions to stefancox@mobilitymastery.com so I can surprise Elisha with them :).

See ya next time,

Stefan

Ultimate Chest and Deltoid Release for Maximum Upper Body Freedom – Get Your Shoulders Back & Down!

I can hardly contain my excitement about this one!!!

Some of the techniques I’ve come up with here at Mobility Mastery can mimic what I do with my private clients to very satisfying degrees, but I’ve spent years wondering how on earth I can give you all out there the chance to experience the kind of lasting upper body relief that a proper chest release can bring – like the kind I’m able to offer my in-person clients. I finally cracked the code on this a few weeks ago!

That’s the good news.

The “bad” news is you’re going to need a very specific medicine ball to get the most out of this one. For a link to a ball that looks similar to the one I have (I can’t guarantee you that it is as I haven’t used this one) that you can purchase on Amazon – click here. (I have no affiliation with this company).

PLEASE NOTE: a baseball, lacrosse ball, larger medicine ball or just about anything NOT what I demo in the video or link to above will NOT give you the best result, may cause bruising and soreness and I do not really recommend using any of these other balls for these reasons. The next best thing would be a SOFTBALL – it’s not going to mold to your body as well, but I’ve tried it and it works ok!

Why release your chest?

I would argue that everyone (at least in the western world) needs this one! We’re all slumped over desks and phones these days, and if you’re in another category of work like a farmer or factory worker then you’re definitely going to have tight fascia here too.

As you can see from the photo there are a lot of converging muscles, nerves and fascia here. The fascia of pec major can get stuck to the fascia of pec minor along with the front deltoid, leading to a “clogged” or stuck intersection, which can definitely lead to pain, less range of motion and shoulder joint issues.

The goal with this technique is to release that front fascia enough that the shoulders are freed to drop back and down where they’re supposed to be, which will relieve the neck and head as well as the arms and even your hips!

Use this technique to relieve or eliminate:

  • Shoulder pain – front, back or rotator cuff issues
  • Neck pain
  • Headaches
  • Forward head posture
  • Pelvic tilts due to shoulder imbalances
  • Pec minor adhesions or restriction
  • Shallow breathing due to chest tightness
  • Jaw and TMJ pain

In combination with other Mobility Mastery techniques can relieve or eliminate:

  • Carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Elbow pain
  • Grip issues
  • Mid back pain
  • and more

How to perform this technique:

  • For the BEST results, please use a Mobility Mastery approved ball and a foam roller (preferably a soft foam roller, but if you want to simultaneously release your quad fascia then by all means go with a hard one 😛 )
  • Your thighs will be resting on the foam roller, and you can use your hip angle to put more or less weight into the ball to compress your chest fascia in whatever way works best for you. Keep in mind that the more weight/compression you can use the better your result will be, however – it will be more intense during the technique!
  • MOVE S L O W L Y !!! I cannot emphasize this enough. Slow movement helps you target the right spots, release fascia effectively and rushing through anything has a tendency to let your brain bypass the experience and not even register that something happened! In other words – if you move fast, you won’t get much benefit.
  • Go ahead and experiment with ball placement, arm movement, rotation, bending and reaching – there’s not “wrong” way to do this if it works for you! And every one of us has different anatomy, so what works for me might not work for you.
  • That said, most of you will get a good result with the bending reaching, especially arm moving “above” your head (on the ground), and if you have restriction in the front deltoid, definitely try the rotations!
  • Spend at least 3-4 minutes per side when you first learn this technique. After you master it you can spend less time. This one can often feel kind of good – and I’m not sure we can do “too much,” because it would simply feel like nothing if the fascia were healthy. So as long as it feels beneficial and you’re keen to get after it – go for it!
  • Remember to BREATHE!
  • Get up when you’re done with one side and move around – you’ll likely notice a significant difference left to right!

 

If you liked this post please “like” and share it!

Subscribe on YouTube for new episodes every Monday.

For personalized help with head to toe pain issues, click here to schedule a private Skype consultation with Elisha Celeste. SIGN UP for exclusive email updates and get $15 off your first session.

How to Release Overactive/Restricted Upper Traps – Relieves Neck + Shoulder Pain, Headaches and More

Those pesky upper traps!

They want to work for us ALL the time. But it’s not their fault. We’ve trained them to be overactive by the ways we sit, stand, work out and move through activities like running and cycling, and how we carry our purses or backpacks.

For a long term “fix” here, we have to get those upper traps to stop working for other muscles like our rhomboids, low traps, low lats and our core. Yes, our traps will actually work for our core to stabilize us through certain movements and activities if our deep core stabilizers aren’t engaged. Click here to read/watch my post on the 3 “R’s” of better posture, which is a great place to start reversing this pattern, and watch out for new episodes addressing this one. It’s so chronic I’ll be covering it from various angles indefinitely!

Today, I’ll show you how to stretch and release those fascial adhesions (aka “knots”) in your upper traps or shoulders.

These knots can cause all kinds of pain and discomfort, from shoulder and neck pain to arm issues, headaches and mid back pain to name a few.

You’ll need access to a barbell and rack for this one. Every gym has one.

Please watch the video for the best results!

How to get the most out of this technique:

  • You can use a bare barbell, or if you want something a little less metalic/cold, try wrapping a towel around it, or use one of the various rack covers that most gyms provide.
  • You’re looking to do TWO things with this technique: 1) STRETCH all the tight fascia in this region which is achieved by pinning a piece of tissue and using your arm AND head to stretch in opposing directions, which creates a good stretch through the whole system (fascia is connective tissue, and as the name implies, it is all connected!) And 2) Find and break up or release the adhesion(s) in your upper traps. This one is more tricky.
  • Once you try the stretch part and feel like you’ve done a decent job at this, move on to finding and releasing the adhesion(s).
  • It may be helpful to start by palpating (feeling your hands) to find out where exactly that sucker is.
  • Then, your job is to pin the knot to the barbell and use head and arm movement to “shear” across the knot and break it up. Think about using your HEAD movement the most here, but make sure you move S L O W L Y !!! Slow movement will reveal that you’re getting it, or tell you you’re not.
  • If you can’t get that knot to “clunk” under the barbell, then try placing the barbell in a different location – maybe farther back towards your posterior and away from your collarbone. That usually does it for me, but everyone is different here.
  • Don’t be afraid to experiment! Try different positions, head movements, reaching your arm or leaving it loose. Each will produce a different sensation and technique in the upper trap. Basically – find what works for YOU and your body.

 

If you liked this post please “like” and share it!

Subscribe on YouTube for new episodes every Monday.

For personalized help with head to toe pain issues, click here to schedule a private Skype consultation with Elisha Celeste. SIGN UP for exclusive email updates and get $15 off your first session.

 

The Truth About Fascia – It Doesn’t Just ‘Wrap’ Muscles & It Might Just be the Fountain of Youth!

So you’ve heard a bit about fascia by now..but do you really know what it is and how it functions in your body?

Fascia (otherwise known as connective tissue) has become quite the buzzword. Which is awesome!

When I started working with fascia in 2008 very few of my new clients knew what it was. Now fascia is a huge topic getting a lot of attention and all of my clients have at least heard of it. Many of the articles I read are spot on. And, a lot of them are – in my opinion – missing what I consider to be the most important details about this critical tissue.

If you’ve been wondering what all the fuss is about, this post is for you!

What is fascia?

In its simplest definition, fascia is a collagen-like substance that separates and connects almost everything in the human body.

Most people are familiar with the kind of fascia found in a steak or chicken breast, because this is similar to the fascia that wraps our muscles – and this is still what most people think of when they hear the word fascia.

But what most people do NOT know is just how much fascia we have, how critical it is for our entire well being and that it’s found in the tiniest of places down to the cellular level.

We have more fascia than anything else, certainly more than muscles and bones!

Fascia wraps every single nerve ending and nerve, every fibril of muscle tissue as well as the fiber (which is made up of multiple fibrils); it wraps every muscle bundle and muscle group and then turns into tendon and ligament (also fascia), which connects to our bones, also wrapped in fascia. It wraps our organs too.

When we observe fascia at the microscopic level and THEN zoom out, things get really interesting. This is about to get sciency, so hang with me.

Why is fascia so critical?

nervefascia

I think we can all agree that nerves – and the nervous system – are critical for us to function optimally every moment we’re alive, right?

Well…

Every nerve in the body is a cordlike structure containing bundles of axons. Within a nerve each axon is surrounded by a layer of connective tissue (fascia) called the endoneurium. The axons are bundled together into groups called fascicles, and each fascicle is wrapped in a layer of connective tissue called the perineurium. Then, the entire nerve is wrapped in a layer of connective tissue called the epineurium.

Fascia wraps each part of a nerve and every nerve in its entirety, and we have a hundred billion of them!

The implications of this fact alone are enormous, and largely unstudied or talked about.

The nervous system is the master regulator of everything that happens to and within us in our lifetimes. Every thought we think produces a feeling, and every single feeling is FELT in the body as sensation, via the nervous system.

I’m convinced the fascia feels everything that our nerves do – perhaps on an even more intense or widespread level.

Take fear for example: whenever we feel fear we tend to experience it as anxiety or adrenaline, tension or stress. When we feel joy it’s often described as light, expansive, buoyant. Our feelings and actions every day direct the hormone cocktail released by the brain to regulate whatever state(s) we’re in.

Literally everything that happens to us in life – good and bad – is felt and recorded within the fascial structure or system.

I also have it on good authority (from an orthopedic surgeon) that fascia bleeds a LOT more than muscle when cut into. Fascia contains more of our blood supply than anything else. This fact alone also gives fascia an incredibly important role – by being the main source of fresh blood within the body.

Healthy fascia gives us “spring” (aka, it’s our shock absorption!)

All connective tissue has within it something called ground substance, one of the most important elements in the human body.

Ground substance is an amorphous gel like substance that surrounds every cell; it contains the nutrients that FEED every cell in our body, AND it takes the waste excreted by every cell and ushers it out of our body.

So basically – fascia is our nutrient AND waste distributor!

That’s not all though…

Read More

The One Rule of Effective Fascial Release, And Why Massage Doesn’t ‘Release’ Fascia

Have you ever wondered why massage therapy doesn’t “release” fascia? I mean…those deep tissue massages hurt! They must be doing something, right?

I want to let you in on a little secret that will help you understand fascia and how to create changes within that soft tissue system that last.

First…let’s dive into a mini crash course on fascia, just in case you’re still unsure exactly what this stuff is.

What is fascia?

Fascia is a collagen-like substance that permeates the entire human body. Every nerve ending is coated in a piece of fascia, as is every muscle fibril and fiber, every muscle bundle and group, and all of this turns into tendon and ligament, which attach to our joints. Even our bones and organs are wrapped in fascia! We have more of this substance in our body than anything else.

While the picture to the right is a great example of how it wraps the muscle fibers, what that image doesn’t show is all the billions of nerves it wraps that travel within the soft tissue system, which means this stuff isn’t linear – it’s a vast and criss-crossing matrix.

Fascia is supposed to be elastic, flexible, STRONG and resilient. Since it wraps literally everything in the body that supports LIFE, I have come to believe it is meant to be almost bulletproof; like the Kevlar that protects our nerves, muscle fibers, bones and organs. (It’s much, much more than this, but this’ll do for today’s crash course).

If fascia were easily change-able we’d be in BIG trouble! Every time we bump into anything we’d damage ourselves. Heck, even sitting down would cause a re-molding of the fascia in our hips and butts if fascia were that quick to change.

Thus, it is my conclusion that fascia will not change easily due to ANY outside force attempting to change it (if it did, it would betray one of its primary roles in our evolution!)

This includes most methods of massage therapy as well as all those fancy new gadgets and gizmos one the market right now that claim to melt or release your fascia if you smash and blast it hard enough.

To truly change the fascial system, we have to ask the fascia to change itself.

Read More

Master Mobility by Learning the Distinctions Between Flexibility, Inflexibility and Fascial Restrictions Part 3 – Flexibility or Mobility Issue?

Screen Shot 2016-08-09 at 12.09.28 PM

This is Part 3 in a 3-Part series. Click here for Part 1 and click here for Part 2.

When is “inflexibility” a fascial restriction or mobility issue, and when is it true inflexibility?

That’s the topic of Part 3, the last in this series.

Fascial restriction can APPEAR to impact flexibility, and this is a really important distinction to understand because if we try to target what seems inflexible rather than going after the cause of immobility, we could injure ourselves or make things a lot worse.

I will not be covering every possible example of this or we’d be here all day, but I do want to give you the ones I see the most in my private practice.

Got tight hamstrings? Are you SURE?

The most common example of this is when the hamstrings appear tight or inflexible when what is really going on is a low back pain pattern (even if you don’t have low back pain).

If you’re in a fascial restriction pattern that is endangering your spine, your brain will step in to PROTECT you by limiting your range of motion.

In the case of low back pain patterns it is my opinion that the brain recruits the GLUTES and hamstrings to tighten up neurologically to keep you from injuring your spine.

The real CAUSE of distress in the low back is going to be somewhere in the quads and quad hip flexors, the IT Bands or adductors.

Most often it is actually the glutes that are the “tightest” (neurologically speaking, NOT from overuse) and if the glutes are in lock down there’s no way you’re going to be able to reach down and touch your toes. (Your body is PROTECTING you). But the problem is NOT hamstring inflexibility. I see a LOT of people attempting to stretch their hamstrings in an attempt to relieve low back pain and posterior chain tightness and I always cringe!

And…some people just have inflexible hamstrings, plain and simple.

The key to mastering your mobility is to learn how to know the difference.

Other examples:

Read More

Master Mobility by Learning the Distinctions Between Flexibility, Inflexibility and Fascial Restriction Issues; Part 1 of 3

Screen Shot 2016-08-09 at 12.09.28 PM

“Will I be able to do the splits after you work on me?”

I’ve been asked this quite a few times when new clients walk into my office. My rise to fame would be meteoric if I could perform such a feat! The answer is NO, it doesn’t work that way.

Just because you are so flexible you can wrap yourself into a pretzel does NOT mean your fascia is healthy. Conversely, just because your fascia is healthy (maybe you’ve become a fascial release ninja?!) does NOT necessarily mean you will achieve an increase in flexibility. Though it might…

There is definitely some overlap and if you’re going to win the game of mastering your mobility, then it’s critical to understand the distinctions.

I’m going to do my best to break this down and make the info WORK for you and your goals.

This is PART ONE of a THREE PART series.

What does it mean to be flexible?

We all need to be flexible to a certain degree to perform everyday tasks: bending over to pick children or groceries up; being able to sit, walk and move with ease.

Take flexibility a step further and you might think of the people next to you in yoga who can go all the way into pigeon pose without screaming (definitely not me), or sit comfortably in a deep squat with perfect form and no knee pain (me!)

Take it to an even greater extreme and we’re talking about those people are so bendy it doesn’t even seem “right.” These are usually gymnasts, dancers, performers or dedicated yogis who have taken their practice to a totally different level: the human pretzel! (Yikes).

What does it mean to have healthy fascia?

Healthy fascia is SPACIOUS and fluid, well lubricated and springy, strong AND elastic (SUPPLE). Spacious is the KEY word.

When your fascia is in an optimal state it won’t hurt AT ALL when weight or compression is applied. That means you could have a sumo wrestler standing with his full weight on your IT Band and it wouldn’t hurt a bit! True story. (Actually I haven’t tested that one yet, but I should! Ha. That picture to the right is me devilishly excited to work on my apprentice’s IT Band, AND it demonstrates my hyper-mobile elbow and shoulder joints).

If your entire fascial system is healthy, it will act as one unit like a highly adaptive SPRING (click here for a specific post on this), allowing us to sprint, jump and fall with minimal impact on our bones.

We have as our birthright the ability to play and move as we want because our fascial system is designed to absorb impact AND allow us to spring out of jumps and steps with fluid elasticity.

Most of us, however, have unhealthy fascia to varying degrees and don’t even know how GOOD we can feel because fascia is only JUST beginning to make a name for itself within the fitness, medical and alternative wellness worlds. Getting our fascia healthy should NOT be limited (in my opinion) just to those of us in pain! Kind of like eating well and being active, the healthier our fascia the better we will feel in our bodies on a daily basis and PREVENT all kinds of soft tissue and joint pain as we age.

Distinctions between Flexibility, Hyper-mobility and Inflexibility:

Read More

Release Your Biceps and Free Your Arms, Shoulders and Neck

Screen Shot 2016-08-09 at 12.09.28 PM

I often refer to the biceps as “the quads of the upper body.” Meaning, if I had to choose only ONE thing for every person in the western world to release in their upper body, it would be the biceps (more specifically, ALL the fascia within and around this muscle group INCLUDING the brachialis junction).

The biceps play a KEY role in upper body movement, and when the fascia within and surrounding them gets restricted it can wreak havoc on everything up AND downstream. (The quads are similarly critical in lower body and pelvic movement/structure, and if I had to choose only ONE thing to release in the lower body it would be the quads).

Reasons to release the fascia in your biceps:

  • Helps relieve shoulder issues, especially bicep tendon issues
  • Relieves elbow pain (especially when combined with my forearm or brachialis techniques)
  • Helps with carpal tunnel and wrist pain (combine with the forearms release linked to above)
  • Can be a player in neck issues and neck pain (combine with the pec and deltoid and trap/scalene release)
  • General upper body fascial health – keeping your biceps fascia free, unrestricted and elastic means better efficiency in your everyday life and activities!

Now, let’s look at some anatomy:

Pictured to the right you can see how connected the biceps are to the shoulder joint AND the elbow joint, and you can probably imagine because everything is connected, how they are also linked to the scapula (and rotator cuff) as well as the neck.

When the fascia in the upper arm gets dehydrated, shrinks and sticks to itself in balls, this pulls on ALL of the above mentioned joints and can contribute or be the main cause of a lot of issues, from radiating pain down the arm to rotator cuff and shoulder joint pain as well as biceps tendon tears and neck pain.

Is this a one-off solution for any of the above mentioned issues? Most likely not. MOST of the time there is a chain of connected players in any given “pain pattern,” and all of them need to be addressed to eliminate the issue.

I highly recommend using this technique IN CONJUNCTION with other techniques, depending on your goal.

Tips for getting the most out of this technique:

  • I tried several different balls for this, and the baseball was BY FAR the best. The lacrosse ball (my usual favorite) was a little too small. So if you can find a baseball you will definitely get the BEST result.
  • Take your time finding the right “pin”, and this might be different for every one of you. For me, the best way to pin my biceps is to start with the short head, or on the “inside” meaty part like I demonstrate in the video, and then use rotation to separate the stuck fascia between the two heads.
  • Take a lunging stance in order to sink your weight into the ball and get the best result with more compression.
  • Spread your fingers wide and make sure your arm is mostly or totally straight. This engages ALL the fibers of muscle and surrounding fascia in your entire arm, ensuring the best result that will affect joints up and down the chain.
  • Make sure you’re actually PINNING the tissues and not just rolling over or “massaging” them. This won’t actually release the fascia!
  • There may only be ONE or maybe two spots to go after on this one. If you get it right, you will only need 30 or so seconds, or maybe 10 back and forth rotations. Then I’d leave it for a day.
  • If you’re using this to get out of pain, make sure you include whatever other techniques may be necessary to get the best result.
  • If it’s a wrist or carpal tunnel issue, go after your forearms and brachialis.
  • If it’s a shoulder issue, you could use my pec and deltoid release.
  • If you’re looking to eliminate neck pain, definitely go after your pec and deltoid as well as your traps and scalenes.
  • If you have pain between the shoulder blades, click here for the best techniques to address that.
  • Use the SEARCH box in the right sidebar to find what you need on this site.

 

If you liked this post please “like” and share it!

Subscribe here and on YouTube for new posts every Monday.

For personalized help with head to toe pain issues, click here to schedule a private Skype consultation with Elisha Celeste. SUBSCRIBE below and get $15 off your first session.

 

The Gift of Pain-Free Running + The ULTIMATE IT-Band Release (Nix ITBS For Good!)

Screen Shot 2016-08-09 at 12.09.28 PM

 

Are you a runner?

Maybe you know what it’s like…you’re out there on a trail or path, flying like you always do when suddenly your knee gives out and a shot of stabbing pain nearly takes you to the ground. Weird. That’s never happened before. You’re able to finish your run and the pain stops when you do. So you keep stepping out your door to do this thing you love so much. But next time it’s worse. You rest a week and try again; and this time the pain starts right away instead of at mile 4. Some people complain about the pain of running, but not you…you thrive on it! The pain that will stop you from running is the pain you fear the most.

This post is dedicated to all you runners out there!

I know what it is like to be stopped from running due to pain (knee pain specifically). In fact, my knee pain stopped me from running for 8 YEARS. It wasn’t until I found the right kind of fascial release (and knowing what to target), that I was able to fix my knee pain. Now I can trail run and climb mountains pain-free (I even run DOWN mountains with zero pain!) My pain seemed to originate more in my calf, but I think the IT Band played a part as well, as it does for a lot of runners.

I recently got an email testimonial that I have to share. Her story is incredible and I think it will help some of you who are struggling with ITBS, or Iliotibial Band Syndrome.

I’m also going to share my “Ultimate IT Band Release” technique. If you want to skip straight to the technique video and tips, scroll down.

Rachael’s Story

Hi there,

My name is Rachael, and I absolutely HAVE to share my little story with you, mainly because, it involves you.

I started running last year in April. I found a running group (Moms Run This Town) and that was all she wrote- I was off like a mad woman running my life away. For the first time, I found something I was good at. I started doing races and loved running even more. By September, I had already run 6 half marathons, and close to 700 miles, and had signed up to do my first full marathon at Big Sur the following April. I was really out of control. In October I ran The Rock N Roll half in San Jose, and a week later made a last minute decision to take someones bib for the Nike half; this turned out to be the worst decision I could have made as a still new runner. 3 days after Nike, I could barely walk. My knee pain was so bad, and stand-to- sit was killing me. My running was totally sidelined.

After I tried to run with a friend in November the pain was too much, and she recognized the symptoms from her own issue- ITBS. I was in denial, but saw a sports chiro to see if he could help. Of course he confirmed the ITBS diagnoses and had me coming to see him for ART therapy three times a week at $90 a pop. I did this for 5-6 weeks knowing my marathon training was starting in January. Eventually he ok’d me to run, but the pain came back. Next I went to see an orthopedic surgeon, and again I was told the IT band was super tight. He sent me to physical therapy, and again I spent hundreds of dollars. Meanwhile my training had started and I had to really modify my plan- by God, I was not going to miss my race! Week after week I went to PT and got no relief. Next we did cortisone treatments, they didn’t even help a little. I stretched, I rolled, I used a tens-unit, I iced, I did squats and lunges for my weak glutes and hips, I changed shoes, I got inserts, I read hundreds of articles on the internet….You name it I did it. Nothing helped, but I kept training anyways.

I ran my marathon, and I will never forget that experience. Both knees blew out at mile 22 and I had to walk the last 4 miles. However, Big Sur is the most beautiful race and I am glad I did it. When I got home, my ortho suggested PRP treatments and I figured, hell, why not. We did two of those. I took 4 months off and just barely started running again in late August. Much to my disappointment, the pain and the swelling in the IT band came back. I decided to give up on running, clearly nothing could heal this injury.

Then about 6-7 weeks ago, my friend from the running group posted one of your videos, not the IT band one, but what ever it was I watched it, which displayed links to your other videos in the corner. Then I saw it- the IT band foam rolling video by you. I figured I’d check it out and try it. I was well aware of the two HUGE knots in along the IT band, so when I saw your method it made sense, so I gave it a go. OMG- I writhed in pain, it hurt so bad, more than ART hurt- and that was painful. I tried your way again later that night, and then every day for the rest of the week. The knots became more movable- like I was able to massage them with my thumbs and get them to move around. I decided to go for a run, a simple 5k in the neighborhood it was pain free.. Hmm, weird. So I kept up your method after runs, once in the morning and once at night. I ran some more, no swelling, no pain- NOTHING. This week I really pushed my limits, I did some trail runs, on major hills in this area, I was expecting the worst the next morning on both days- but nothing happened.

Is it a coincidence? Did it heal on it’s own? How could something so simple fix this? How could your video change everything? Doctors and PT’s and chiropractors couldn’t fix it, how could this simple rolling technique do it? I am still in disbelief, I keep waiting for the pain to return, but I also keep rolling. The knots are still there, they are still big, but somehow it’s different.

So the point of all of this? From me to you- THANK YOU. For something so simple, for some video free on the internet that has given me the gift of running again! I am pain free and increasing my miles.. I am at a loss for words other than thank you. What ever you have here- you should sell it because quite frankly it works.

You will forever be my hero! Thank you so much for this gift!!

Read More