Improve Your Posture to Relieve or Prevent Text Neck, Shoulder and Mid Back Pain

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Our posture pretty much sucks these days.

This isn’t about propriety or your grandma yelling “stop slouching!”

This is about your quality of life, because in our modern era poor posture doesn’t just mean a bit of shoulder tension or slightly forward rotated shoulders – it means PAIN, and lots of it.

While smart phones were a genius invention, our insatiable appetite for constant engagement means we’re hunched over our phones all day every day. (I mean, I even see people crossing the street or riding their bike while cranking their heads down to stare at their phones!)

All this hunching over and bending our necks puts the equivalent of a 60 POUND WEIGHT on our cervical spine!

Over time this creates a nightmarish domino effect of pain, because an unhealthy cervical spine can lead to serious neck pain, shoulder issues; mid back pain; low back pain, elbow tendonitis or wrist issues, not to mention grip issues from lack of nerve ennervation to the hands due to fascial blocks created in the scalene area of our neck.

The THREE “R’s” of better posture:

  1. Release the overworked, over-tight areas.
  2. Restore muscle memory and neural pathways of good posture.
  3. Reinforce the muscle memory and neural pathway of good posture by strengthening the weak/overstretched muscles in your mid/upper back.

RELEASE:

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Pec and Front Deltoid Release for Relaxed Shoulders and Necks

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If you look down at your phone all day, work on a computer, have small children and carry them frequently, have forward head posture or forward rotated shoulders etc, then this is something you will want to include in a weekly fascial health routine.

You will need a lacrosse ball for these two techniques.

Release your pecs for more upper body freedom!

While we will certainly grab and stretch pec major in this technique, it is really THE FASCIA in and around pec minor that we want to target.

Pec minor attaches to the 3rd, 4th and 5th ribs and draws the scapula forward and down, and elevates the ribs if the origin and insertion are reversed. 

The primary actions of this muscle include the stabilization, depression, abduction or protraction, upward tilt, and downward rotation of the scapula. When the ribs are immobilized, this muscle brings the scapula forward, and when the scapula is fixed, it lifts up the rib cage. (Excerpt from healthline.com)

As you can see it plays a huge role in shoulder mobility. When overly tight it contributes to forward head posture, forward rotated shoulders and the pain patterns that arise from this (which include neck pain, shoulder pain, headaches etc).

These techniques can help address:

  • Shoulder pain
  • Rotator cuff issues
  • Forward head posture
  • Forward rotated shoulders
  • Headaches, if they are tension related
  • Neck Pain
  • Whiplash
  • TMJ pain
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