How to Eliminate Shin Splints – for Everyone Tired of Hearing “Maybe You Should Try Swimming”

Have you ever tried to start running regularly, only to be stopped by sharp stabbing pain in your shins? Every step can feel like shards of glass breaking into your soft tissue, or maybe you feel like your bones are about to break. If you’ve experienced what I’m talking about then you know how frustratingly painful shin splints are.

You don’t have to suffer through shin splints in order to become (or stay) a runner.

A lot of you know about the knee pain that stopped me from running for 8 years and hiking for 6, but it actually started with shin splints.

I was 16, had stopped doing gymnastics and took up running. I loved the freedom and strength I felt during and after a nice long run. Pretty soon after I started running regularly I experienced that stabbing pain in my shins. Being stubborn and someone with a high pain tolerance, I just kept running. Eventually the shin splints went away; but I ended up with horrific knee pain a year later. This new pain was something I couldn’t ignore. Sharp stabbing pain literally brought me to my knees, and there was no way to run through that.

I now know these two things were connected, and had I taken care of the shin splints like I’m about to show you how – I never would have experienced such debilitating knee pain and I could have kept running and hiking all those years.

What are shin splints?

Medically speaking, shin splints (or medial tibial stress syndrome) is considered an overuse issue specifically from running and often from running on hard surfaces like pavement.

They tell us you’re at risk if:

  • you’re a runner or just beginning a running program
  • you change the duration, length or frequency of your running
  • you’re in the military
  • have high or flat arches
  • etc

Then there’s a laundry list of ways to “manage” the pain, such as:

  • have your running gait analyzed
  • buy shoes with more support/cushion
  • try inserts with shock absorption
  • lessen the impact of your activities by adding things like swimming and biking and
  • do more strength training…

But NONE of the above address the actual CAUSE of shin splints.

Besides, if you love running and you just wanna be out there pounding pavement or miles of dirt…you don’t want to hear things like “try swimming instead.” Right?

I’m here to tell you, you can run to your heart’s content SO LONG AS you address the CAUSE of your shin splints. And – it’s fairly EASY once you “get” it.

So what causes shin splints?

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Release Tibialis Anterior and Peroneals Fascia to Relieve Pain on TOPS of Feet, Shin Splints, Foot Cramps and More

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If you have tendonitis or pain on the TOPS of your feet, cramping on the BOTTOMS of your feet, shin splints or a strained/pulled soleus muscle then you are going to LOVE this. (And those are just a FEW of the things this technique can help with).

TOOLS NEEDED: Lacrosse ball and 25+lb weight plate (most gyms have both of these).

Please take the necessary steps to do this with the same equipment I’m using in the video, because I want you to get the BEST result, and you will NOT get the same result using a tennis ball, golf ball, soft ball or any ball without a weight plate.

Let’s look at some anatomy shall we? (Hello my fellow body/anatomy nerds!)

The fascia here affects SO MANY things:

Remember, it’s the FASCIA we’re after in terms of releasing tissue, not any particular muscle(s).

The muscles are important though because they indicate which direction(s) the tissues move in terms of shortening and lengthening and acting on various joints – and it’s where and how the tissues are being asked to move combined with the fascial restrictions within the muscle groups that is what creates the pain patterns I’m about to talk about.

Tibialis anterior:

Otherwise known as the “shin muscle,” tibialis anterior (or TA for short) attaches laterally at the top of the tibia, near the knee, and (via its distal tendon) attaches to the medial cuneiform (a bone on the inside of the foot) and first two metatarsals (which lead to the big toe bones).

Got BIG TOE issues? This is definitely something to check!

TA dorsiflexes the ankle and inverts the foot.

Peroneals:

All three peroneal muscles attach to the fibula and metatarsals of the foot.

Here is where things get interesting: all three of these muscles evert the foot, but two peroneal muscles – fibularis or peroneus longus and fibularis or peroneus brevis – plantarflex the foot while fibularis or peroneus tertius dorsiflexes it!

So between tibialis anterior and the peroneals all acting on the foot in opposing ways, it’s no surprise that if the fascia gets clogged, tight, dehydrated or stuck…ANY of these actions of the foot could become confused leading to dysfunction (or pain) anywhere downstream of the knee – the ankle and retinaculum, the tops of the feet and toes, the plantar fascia, pain with eversion or inversion…and possibly pain upstream as well, due to gait changes or how the ankle affects the knee which affects the hip, etc.

Let’s explore the most common issues this release technique will help relieve:

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